In the Media

The Right to Know is Law – Will the NYPD Abide by It?

11/13/2018
Gotham Gazette

New York City recently took an important step toward police reform. The long-anticipated Right To Know Act has officially gone into effect, with important provisions dictating police-civilian encounters. The Act includes critical laws that will help end unconstitutional searches and require that police officers both identify themselves and provide the reason for an encounter – even leaving a business card in certain interactions.

Extreme Makeover: Precinct Edition

Can designing friendlier precinct houses help the NYPD fix decades-old tensions between communities and police?
A proposed redesign of the 73rd precinct by students at the New York School of Interior Design features new bulletproof glass doors, bright colors and modern wayfinding signs (Photo courtesy of NYSID)
10/22/2018
Medium | The Brooklyn Ink

In the 73rd precinct in Brownsville, reporting a crime goes like this: you step through a brick entryway into a cramped, dimly-lit room and you wait there, staring at a wall.

A set of double doors and a window break up the metal barrier, but red-lettered signs remind you that you aren’t allowed to go through. On the other side of the plexiglass, police dash around the station’s spacious interior. They pay little mind to the lobby, where the four plastic seats are often taken, leaving everyone else to stand on the stained linoleum.

Right to Know Is Now the Law. Here’s What That Means.

Police officers in New York City must provide more information to members of the public they interact with, and get consent for many searches.
The Right to Know Act was passed in 2017 in response to the uproar over the Police Department's use of stop-and-frisk.CreditCreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times
10/19/2018
New York Times

The New York Police Department ordered 10 million business cards that officers must hand out to people they stop on the street. The cards will include the officers’ names and ranks, and are required under the new Right to Know Act.

Right To Know Act Takes Effect: What NYers Should Expect

Two landmark police-reform bills aiming to protect New Yorkers in their interactions with cops officially take effect Friday.
10/19/2018
Patch

NEW YORK — New York City cops have to give business cards to people they stop and ask for permission to perform certain searches starting Friday as two landmark police-reform laws take effect. The City Council passed the contentious pair of bills, known as the Right to Know Act, last December in an effort to protect New Yorkers' rights and improve police accountability.

Entra en vigor ley que obliga a policías identificarse al detener a alguien

Las nuevas leyes de Derecho a Saber, que se hacen efectivas este viernes, pretende proteger a ciudadanos durante encuentros con el NYPD, especialmente hispanos y negros
Concejal Antonio Reynoso durante una rueda de prensa en el City Hall, previo al inicio de la Ley de Derecho a Saber.
10/18/2018
El Diario NY

Ni el paso de los años, 24 para ser más precisos, han podido borrar el dolor que sintió Iris Baez el día que encontró muerto a su hijo Anthony. El joven fue sometido a una llave de estrangulamientopor el oficial del Departamento de Policía de Nueva York (NYPD) Francis Livoti el 22 de diciembre de 1994.

Police reform advocates pledge to be vigilant as Right to Know Act takes effect

NYPD officers in certain encounters must identify themselves and inform the public they can deny a search when there isn't probable cause.
Police reform advocates and City Council members rallied at City Hall to call on the NYPD to comply with the Right to Know Act, which will go into effect on Friday. Photo Credit: Kayla Simas/Kayla Simas
10/18/2018
AM New York

Public officials and police reform advocates pledged to hold the NYPD accountable for their encounters with the public as new legislation goes into effect Friday.

Holding signs and banners reading "I do not consent to this search," activists rallied on the steps of City Hall to celebrate the implementation of the Right to Know Act. The legislation has two components: a requirement for officers (in certain instances) to identify themselves when approaching the public, and a mandate to inform a person of their right to refuse to consent to a search when the officer doesn't have probable cause. 

Police reform advocates fear de Blasio administration and NYPD are 'obstructing' law requiring consent to some searches

10/17/2018
New York Daily News

New laws requiring NYPD officers to identify themselves and receive consent before conducting some searches are set to go into effect Friday — and police reform advocates are worried the de Blasio administration is already trying to wriggle out of the rules.

Police Reform Is Coming to New York City, but Will the NYPD Follow the Law?

10/16/2018
ACLU Blog

In December 2017, the New York City Council passed two police reform measures, collectively known as the Right to Know Act, which aimed to improve communication and transparency during police stops and searches. On Friday, both bills will take full effect, and the New York Police Department will be tasked with implementing the council’s mandate to become more transparent and accountable. But there are good reasons to be skeptical that the NYPD will implement the law faithfully. 

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