In the Media

EXCLUSIVE: Relatives of those who died at hands of police push for repeal of NYS law shielding release of cop disciplinary records

12/24/2018
New York Daily News

ALBANY — Citing the recent case in which officers ripped a baby from a woman’s arms while arresting her, the relatives of 16 people killed by police are seeking passage of a bill requiring the NYPD to publicly release officer disciplinary records.

Headley Case Again Raises Questions About NYPD Accountability Under De Blasio

12/18/2018
Gotham Gazette

When video was captured in 2014 of Staten Island resident Eric Garner dying with an NYPD officer’s arm wrapped around his neck, just months after the election of a progressive mayor promising a new day at the police department, it seemed like a watershed moment. The evidence was there for millions to see for themselves, across the city and country, and beyond. It seemed impossible that the officer, Daniel Pantaleo, would escape any accountability. But more than four years later there has been little beyond Pantaleo’s move to desk duty.

The Right to Know is Law – Will the NYPD Abide by It?

11/13/2018
Gotham Gazette

New York City recently took an important step toward police reform. The long-anticipated Right To Know Act has officially gone into effect, with important provisions dictating police-civilian encounters. The Act includes critical laws that will help end unconstitutional searches and require that police officers both identify themselves and provide the reason for an encounter – even leaving a business card in certain interactions.

Extreme Makeover: Precinct Edition

Can designing friendlier precinct houses help the NYPD fix decades-old tensions between communities and police?
A proposed redesign of the 73rd precinct by students at the New York School of Interior Design features new bulletproof glass doors, bright colors and modern wayfinding signs (Photo courtesy of NYSID)
10/22/2018
Medium | The Brooklyn Ink

In the 73rd precinct in Brownsville, reporting a crime goes like this: you step through a brick entryway into a cramped, dimly-lit room and you wait there, staring at a wall.

A set of double doors and a window break up the metal barrier, but red-lettered signs remind you that you aren’t allowed to go through. On the other side of the plexiglass, police dash around the station’s spacious interior. They pay little mind to the lobby, where the four plastic seats are often taken, leaving everyone else to stand on the stained linoleum.

Right to Know Is Now the Law. Here’s What That Means.

Police officers in New York City must provide more information to members of the public they interact with, and get consent for many searches.
The Right to Know Act was passed in 2017 in response to the uproar over the Police Department's use of stop-and-frisk.CreditCreditTodd Heisler/The New York Times
10/19/2018
New York Times

The New York Police Department ordered 10 million business cards that officers must hand out to people they stop on the street. The cards will include the officers’ names and ranks, and are required under the new Right to Know Act.

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